Collonges-la-Rouge

Collonges-la-Rouge, in Corrèze was a regular stopover on the Santiago de Compostela pilgrim route.

Most of its striking deep-red sandstone buildings date back to the XVIth century, its heyday, when everyone who was anyone within the viscounty of Turenne had a residence here. Independent of the French crown until the 1730s, Collonges was virtually abandoned in the XIXth century, overshadowed by its equally red neighbour, Meyssac, before rising again from its ruins to find a new lease of life in tourism.

Web : www.tourismecorreze.com

Curemonte

Curemonte

Curemonte is visible from afar, high on a rocky spur, dominated by three castles. The writer Colette and her daughter spent the war years in one of these, the late XIVth century Château Saint-Hilaire, where she wrote her ‘Journal à Rebours’ (1941) in which she marvels at the presence of the three castles.

Long abandoned, the village has been restored by the tenacious Friends of Curemonte association, and is much in demand for films, one of whose sets has been left in situ, quaint shopfronts and all.

Web : www.tourismecorreze.com

Mortemart

Three different religious orders cohabitated in Mortemart, each with its own ensemble of elegant buildings: a Carthusian monastery and two convents, one Carmelite, the other Augustinian, built on square plans and completed right up to the XVIIIth century. They surrounded the Dukes of Mortemart Xth century castle, whose fortifications have disappeared. The Augustinian chapel subsequently became the village church. It has superbly carved choirstalls with aptly named miserichords, which allowed the monks to be seated without giving the impression of doing so! The magnificent covered hall in the centre still hosts the weekly market.

www.tourisme-haut-limousin.com

Saint-Robert

Saint-Robert lies to the west of the region, on the border between Corrèze and Dordogne, overlooking meadows, poplars and walnut trees.

This sizeable medieval hilltop village has an early XIIth century Benedictine priory and an imposing Romanesque church with amusing details such as a capital depicting two old men pulling each others’ beards. It also has many elegant mansions, fortified houses and pleasant architectural details. Don’t miss its annual summer music festival.

Web : www.vacances-en-correze.net/fr

Ségur-le-Château

It is hard to imagine that this peaceful medieval village nestled in the bend of the Auvézère river, was once the site of bitter fighting during the Hundred Years’ War and an important town in the XVIth century.

Discover its narrow streets lined with half-timbered houses and turrets and climb the foot of the feudal castle.

Web : http://www.tourismecorreze.com

Turenne

Turenne's two towers and castle ramparts overlook the pretty stone rooftops of this most appealing medieval village. Once the seat of the powerful viscounty of Turenne - one of four to rule the region in the Middle Ages, together with Limoges, Comborn and Ventadour - it minted money and levied taxes. In the XIIth century, one of its viscounts was the first known pilgrim to set forth for Santiago de Compostela.

Its most famous lord was Henri de La Tour d’Auvergne, the Grand Turenne, a military hero under Louis XIV. France’s last independent feudal fiefdom, Turenne’s days of glory ended in 1738 when its impoverished viscount sold up to Louis XV.

Web : www.tourismecorreze.com